Ambulance station progress on show

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The new building had a garage capable of housing two ambulances, Mrs Kelly said.

A separate garage would be built to house the health shuttle and a van.

The new station had four bedrooms to sleep volunteer staff when they were on duty, she said.

The Gore station had seven paid staff and 16 volunteers.

A large training room was also part of the new building, she said.

“It [the training room] can be divided off to have smaller groups if need be.”

The organisation was looking forward to the cost savings the new building would yield such as savings in electricity, as the building would be double-glazed and well-insulated.

St John Hokonui area chairwoman Karen Morris said the construction phase was going well and she was happy with the progress.

The finish date had been extended to the first week in August, Ms Morris said.

One of the reasons for the slight delay was that the doors for the new building had to be imported from Amsterdam.

The doors had to comply with IL4 standards.

“I actually think we are doing really well.”

St John was also embarking on several fundraising initiatives to make up the funding shortfall such as a buy-a-brick campaign and selling plaques, Mrs Kelly said.

If people would like to buy a brick or a plaque, they can contact the St John office.

ambulance station, forecast to cost about $1.8million, threw open its doors to invited guests on Tuesday.

St John decided to replace the building after a nationwide assessment of stations found deficiencies in the Gore station.

A tour of the partially completed 559sq m single-storey building was given to representatives of organisations including Southern Wide Real Estate and the Gore Pakeke Lions, St John Hokonui area executive officer Vicki Kelly said.

The station in Charlton Rd was earlier estimated to cost just under $1.74million to build. However, the cost has grown to about $1.8million and the shortfall in funding is $500,000.

The new station will comply with IL4 (importance level 4) standards, which deem an ambulance station to be essential to post-disaster recovery and require it to be able to continue to function after a disaster.