Fast insight into career choice paths

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Listening...Rose McDonald (14, right) tries out a stethescope with registered nurse Jasna Hunter at the speed networking careers event at Menzies College on Friday

A Southern District Health Board nurse found herself on the receiving end of a stethoscope as year 9 and 10 pupils checked her vital signs at Menzies College on Friday.

It was part of an event arranged by commerce teacher and career support person Lincoln Joyce in conjunction with Great South to give younger pupils a rendezvous with various career paths.

“This is the first time we’ve done this,” Mr Joyce said.

Speed-dating was the basis of the event’s format.

“We came up with this idea to give kids great exposure to career choices.”

Six tables were set up in the school’s hall, representing six different industries.

These were: Construction & infrastructure; primary industries; creative industries; service industries; social & community services; and manufacturing & technology.

Industry employees manned each table and explained to the pupils the paths they had taken to get into their jobs and what those jobs involved.

“They find out so much about the options available.”

Pupils could ask questions, and each table had displays.

These ranged from slideshows to glider hubcaps to medical equipment.

Pupils were split into small groups and spent eight minutes at each table before moving on to the next.

While older pupils were always encouraged to think seriously about their post-school lives, there was good reason for younger pupils to look to the future as well, he said.

“I think it’s important, especially at this time of year.

“Career options they’re interested in lead on to subject choices.”

Year 10 pupil Rose McDonald said science class would be on her timetable next year.

She already knew she wanted to work in the healthcare industry but found the display at the social & community services table inspiring.

“I want to be a doctor or a surgeon .. I want to help people and make sure they’re fit and healthy,” Rose said.

The 14-year-old enjoyed using the a stethoscope on one of the nurses.

“I was listening to her bowels and her heart.

“It’s really interesting to see how some of the machines work . It’s so cool, it intrigues me.”